Efficiency obsession: Power Reading

My biggest quirk is this stupid obsession with efficiency. I’ve spoiled every aspect of my life because of this, and the saddest part is that I enjoy it. When I have a new toy the joy of discovering it ends pretty fast, and I just want to learn how to get the most out of it afterwards. Most of the times, I don’t even need to apply that knowledge; just learning, discussing and testing it is more than enough.

I do it with almost every aspect of my life. When a get a new video game and I enjoy the mechanics, I start learning and theorising how to min max it. How to get the most spending the least time, how to break its virtual economy with handmade cost-related spreadsheets, etc. When I walk, I always think the fastest way to get somewhere, even when there’s no hurry. When I have several episodes of a TV show pending, I watch them at 1.5x. Daenerys listing her titles improves at 1.5, believe me.

And obviously, it also affects my career. I won’t talk about its implications for my daily work now, but how it changes how I face my continuous learning. I’m in the first steps in my career and have plenty of free time, so I usually try to spend a fair amount of it trying new technologies, reading about last trends, doing courses and reading. It’s not always related to my field (like The game or The Book of Five Rings), but instead of reading fantasy literature (which I love doing), I’m focusing on amazing papers that teach me something.

But how is my stupid efficiency obsession affecting my reading? I don’t know how familiar are you with power reading techniques, but lately, I’ve been following this one. I’ve always been a fast reader, although my speed is heavily hammered with technical English-written books. That’s why lately I’ve been trying some of these techniques, to get better comprehension and faster assimilation of the concepts.

I know, the main concern is: you should be enjoying the reading, not rushing it! And that’s completely fair. But as I said, the main reason for reading these books is to increase my expertise in an area, expanding my knowledge, learning new approaches, and summarising the best ideas of it. Power reading achieves all these purposes, along with training a very useful skill in my opinion: reading a really long text and assimilating its key concepts.

“But reading fast is really easy, you only have to skip some paragraphs and voilĂ !”. I’ve also been there. I remember my tedious maths reads, and how I tried to skip everything that didn’t seem enough important. But this time, I have another powerful tool: this blog. For every of this book that I read, I force myself to think about a lesson learnt post, and I start writing a bullet point list of the main subjects and the things I enjoyed the most. Even if I don’t polish and publish the post, it forces me to understand and pay attention to the read!

May the force be with you,

Gino

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